Monthly Archives: September 2016

When You Miss Your Mom and Dad…

What seemed like a normal stop in the laundry room last week turned out to be a devastating downpour.  This is the challenge in losing a loved one.  One little photo can spark a thousand emotions…

Growing up a lonely only was super swell in my book.   My petite universe swirled around me.  No wonder sharing wasn’t in my vocabulary. (Can you say, “spoiled”?)

My Mother and Father married in 1952, but I wasn’t born until 1960.  After eight long years of waiting, who wouldn’t be fearful of a brand new baby girl?  I still believe they had no idea what to do with me.

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(Note most of our pictures were either of Daddy and me or Mother and me as with the three of us, who else would take the picture?  Please don’t miss Daddy’s very svelte argyle socks.  This was 1960.  My sweet sister-in-law got all our boys rockin’ with svelte socks last Christmas.  Yeah, 2015.  Thank you, Nordstrom Rack.)

Mom and Dad perfected helicopter parenting, not wanting a scratch or a bruise to mar my little self.  The day I rode my Radio Flyer Classic Red Wagon down our neighbor’s hill, crashing on the asphalt in our driveway, depositing some skin on the pavement, freaked us all out.  Odd, there was no flying in that wagon.

Once in school, I began inviting friends over.  Many of them were lonely onlies too.

God provided the best kind of friend directly across the street from us.  She was ultra cool because she came with the bonus of having two older brothers.  They were boy scouts and there was nothing they couldn’t do.  Each visit was a new lesson.

Her name is Meredith Myers.  She and I are only one year apart, so for several years, we’d ride our bikes together to Glendover Elementary School in Lexington, Kentucky.  God graciously protected us because we never paid attention to cars near us as we talked non-stop all the way to and from school.

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(Note these little girls are wearing helmets.  Helmets weren’t invented back in our day.  Yes, we are old.)

Meredith’s parents and mine also became close friends and “those were the days” as they say.  Elementary School evolved into “Junior High” (now Middle School), on into High School.

Meredith and I went to different colleges, but we managed to visit each other, staying in touch.  We married three weeks apart and were in each other’s weddings.  She and her husband settled in Nashville while John and I settled in Louisville.

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Meredith lost her parents first.  Both deaths seemed too early and too sudden.  Thankfully, we were able to trust in a Sovereign God.

Two favorite Scriptures  which help are:

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My folks stayed in their home, still across the street from where the Myers lived, as long as they could. Multiple illnesses plus my Dad having a stroke landed them in an Assisted Living facility in Lexington.

Unfortunately that was a short term band-aid, causing us to move them to Louisville into a nearby nursing home.  Our three boys swear they’ve never moved so much furniture so many times. God bless their strong backs.

Daddy had a heart attack that ultimately took his life, followed by a seventeen-month progression of health deterioration in my Mother.  “Only the Lord” is how we answer the question of, “How did we survive those difficult years?”

Deuteronomy 31:6 is one of our favorite “life-lines”: 

“So be strong and courageous.  Do not be afraid and do not panic before them. For the LORD your God will personally go ahead of you.  He will never fail you nor abandon you.” (NLT)  Somehow that little word “panic” resonates. But look at the promise that follows…God will go ahead of us, never failing nor abandoning us.  Isn’t that the best?

Many of our friends are losing their parents too.  I find myself buying sympathy cards by the box.

Visitations and funerals are not at the top of my list of most desirable activities, but of course, who wouldn’t go for a friend?  The greater challenge of attending these services is offering the right words of condolence.  Not a gift of mine, rest assured.

I’m embarrassed to admit that often, the bereaved winds up comforting me because I’ve dissolved into a puddle of tears.  Thus, I’ve resorted to borrowing words of encouragement from a few of my favorite authors:  Max Lucado, Bob Russell and Kerry and Chris Shook.

The Shooks help with a good perspective when a death seems to happen too soon. They tell about a young couple in Owensboro, Kentucky.  The wife discovers she has terminal cancer and soon will be leaving her young children and husband behind.  (This is in their book, One Month to Live—30 Days to a No-Regrets Life.)

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She asks her pastor, Jess Moody, about the below verse:

2 Peter 3:8 “But do not forget this one thing, dear friends:  With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day.”

She did the math, and “figured if a thousand years is like a day, then forty years is like one hour…my husband may live another forty years, but that will be just like an hour to me in heaven.  When he gets to heaven, I’ll greet him and say, ‘Where have you been for an hour?…I’ve missed you.’”

My children may live another seventy or eighty years, but that will be like two hours to me.  When they get to heaven, I’ll greet them and say, ‘How was school today?  Mom misses you when you’re gone for a couple of hours.’”

Jess said, “Now that’s an eternal perspective.”

Max Lucado, in his book, When Christ Comes, quotes Bob Russell.  He tells about Bob’s father’s funeral.

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Bob said the day of the funeral was a “cold, blustery, Pennsylvania day”…The Funeral Director told Bob the roads were too treacherous to take a procession to the burial.  He said he’d take the body to the grave.

Bob couldn’t bear to not be at the burial, “so he and his brother and their sons piled into a four-wheel drive vehicle and followed the hearse.”

Bob said, “We plowed thru’ ten inches of snow into the cemetery, got about fifty yards from my Dad’s grave, with the wind blowing about twenty-five miles per hour, and the six of us lugged that casket down to the grave site…”

He continued, “We watched the body lowered in the grave and we turned to leave.  I felt something was undone, so I said, ‘I’d like for us to have a prayer.’  The six of us huddled together and I prayed, ‘Lord, this is such a cold, lonely place.’

“And then I got too choked up to pray anymore.  I kept battling to get my composure, and finally I just whispered, ‘But I thank you, for we know to be absent from the body is to be safe in your warm arms.’” (2 Corinthians 5:6 KJV)

Max concludes with what I hold onto today:

“We don’t like to say good-bye to those whom we love…It is right for us to weep, there is no need for us to despair.  They had pain here.  They have no pain there.  They struggled here.  They have no struggles there.

“You and I might wonder why God took them home.  But they don’t.  They understand.  They are, at this very moment, at peace in the presence of God.”

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This is an older picture of my parents, but it’s how I like to remember them. It’s the one staring at me over the washer and dryer.  It’s the one that triggered the unexpected tears.

On days when those of us who’ve lost our parents are homesick for them, I pray these words of these great authors plus The Author of the Word of God bring us all comfort.

‘Til next time!

 

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Guest Post from Author Lucinda Secrest McDowell, of “Dwelling Places”…When Will You Finally Slow Down? (Plus Q and A’s…)

Friends! This week we’re in for a real treat. We’ll be hearing from an author friend of mine, Lucinda Secrest McDowell (Cindy) who seems to have a “word” for us all, namely yours truly on a regular basis. I’ve written about a couple of her beautiful, inspirational books in previous posts:

One Word That’ll Make Your Day

When Was the Last Time You Took a Bath?

And Don’t Allow Distractions to Derail You

Cindy is a gifted writer.  She’s been mercifully gracious to me and our Tuesday Bible study group recently when we had the privilege of studying her book Refresh!

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This week we get to hear straight from Cindy, gleaning inspirational words from her newest devotional, Dwelling Places.

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Please join me in reading Cindy’s post we can all relate to as I rush out the door…:


 

When Will You Finally Slow Down?
Lucinda Secrest McDowell

Driving through Pebble Hill Plantation I saw the road sign that caused me to grind to a halt.

“Slow Down. I Mean It!”

And Pansy Poe, the owner of this beautiful estate outside my Georgia hometown, had signed her name to give it more authority.

Actually, God could have authored that sign as well.

I believe He sends signs warning me to “Slow Down” all the time, but I’m usually running by too quickly to notice. Missing what God has for me – “My people will live in peaceful dwelling places, in secure homes, in undisturbed places of rest.” (Isaiah 32.18)

Or, as one seasoned pastor advises, “You must ruthlessly eliminate hurry.”

When was the last time you really rested? Hard to do, isn’t it? Our environment is constantly depleting us with noise, distractions and the compulsion to always be in a hurry. We are just too busy to rest.

“Busyness does not mean you are a faithful or fruitful Christian. It only means that you are busy, just like everyone else,” claims Kevin DeYoung, a pastor and father of six who struggles with finding true rest. “It’s not wrong to be tired. It’s not wrong to feel overwhelmed. It’s not wrong to go through seasons of complete chaos. What is wrong – and heartbreakingly foolish and wonderfully avoidable – is to live a life with more craziness than we want because we have less Jesus than we need.”

Do you want more of Jesus and His rest?

I believe our greatest threat is distraction. Did you know the root of this word is the Latin word distractus which literally means “to draw or pull apart?” No wonder we feel torn in every direction!

The author of “Sanctuary of the Soul” says that we have noisy hearts. “The fact that our schedules are piled high and we are constantly bombarded by multiple stimuli only betrays that we have succumbed to the modern mania that keeps us perpetually distracted. The moment we seek to enter the creative silences of meditative prayer, every demand screams for our attention.”

How can we quiet our hearts and discover these “undisturbed places of rest?”

Unplug. Sign out. Turn off. Hang up. Be ‘Closed for the Weekend.’ Clean up your surroundings so fewer projects call out your name. Put sleep and ‘nothing’ on your agenda and then keep those appointments. Determine your greatest distractions and energy-drainers and decide to be proactive about curbing their power over you.

And then go to Jesus and rest in His care. “Faith means resting – relying – not on who we are, or what we can do, or how we feel or what we know. Faith is resting in who God is and what He has done. And He has done everything.”

Slow Down. I Mean It!

©2016 Lucinda Secrest McDowell Excerpted from “Dwelling Places” by Lucinda Secrest McDowell (Abingdon Press)

 

Lucinda Secrest McDowell is passionate about embracing life — both through deep soul care from drawing closer to God, as well as living courageously in order to touch a needy world. A storyteller who engages both heart and mind, she offers “Encouraging Words” to all on the journey. A graduate of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and Furman University, Cindy is the author of twelve books, including Dwelling Places, Live These Words, Refresh!, Amazed by Grace, Quilts from Heaven and Role of a Lifetime. Whether co-directing the “New England Christian Writers Retreat,” mentoring young moms, or leading a restorative day of prayer, she is energized by investing in people of all ages. Cindy’s favorites include tea parties, good books, laughing friends, ancient prayers, country music, cozy quilts, musical theatre, and especially her family scattered around the world doing amazing things. She writes from “Sunnyside” cottage in New England and blogs weekly at EncouragingWords.net

 

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Thank you, Cindy! Wonderful words of encouragement…

 

Finally, let’s ask her a couple of questions:

How did you come to write this book?

LSM: So…. how did I come to write a book called “Dwelling Places?”  Honestly, this one-word-a-day devotion (meant to both inspire and teach) came out of my own need to know. And to grow.

Every year I choose a “word from the Lord” and find myself marinating in what it means to my life on all levels — spiritually, mentally, emotionally, and physically. Last year the word was DWELL and as I explored the many facets of DWELL, I recognized my own desire to learn how to dwell in peace and serenity and joy and hope; rather than spend my time in exhaustion and hurry, chaos and confusion.

Turns out God’s Word is full of dwelling places – those sanctuaries of refuge and abiding. In my new book “Dwelling Places” I offer 130 of those words and unwrap their meaning through storytelling, biblical teaching and hundreds of quotes from hymns and godly people who are my own teachers.

There are actually four sections which can be read at any time, but they include 30 days for Advent and 40 days for Lent if you’re interested in trying out that special discipline during the church year. DWELL (Fall) SHINE (Advent) RENEW (Lent) GROW (Summer) OR just read any word, any page at any time.

I loved writing this book and felt each word and verse were truly given to me. I absolutely know the benedictions at the end came straight from God through my pen. I am humbled and grateful to be able to share these words. 

 

Why should people read Dwelling Places?

LSM: My observation is that people everywhere are hungering for refuge. A safe place. A true home where they can live authentically. Ask the hard questions, and receive all the grace and mercy needed after devastation. In my speaking and writing I long to help show that all throughout God’s Word the precious concept of “dwelling in His constant presence” is lifted up. In the Old Testament we are directed to sanctuary, refuge, and called to Be Still. In the New Testament we are encouraged that Christ wants to make His home in our hearts.

So I decided to write a devotional that lifted up these concepts – each day based on One Word in a key verse. My goal is that throughout the stories that are shared, the biblical and historical profiles mentioned, the hymns, poetry, and even children’s books will all work together to help teach the reader how to live the deeper “with God” life. But at the same time enjoy the process of knowing where to find hope, grace and mercy. In other words, these are words that touch a hurting world. Everything I do must have a practical aspect so I hope there is a takeaway each day on how to live the word you have just been reading about. Also, I felt compelled to offer a short benediction, as though God were now giving His blessing and charge on your going forth, now strengthened with His Word in your heart and mind.

 

Will you share some favorite quotes from Dwelling Places?

 “So I embraced both meanings of dwell: 1. To live 2. To focus. It soon became obvious that all too often I live amid hurry and obligation, dwelling in anxiety and surrounded by noise. And where was my default focus – circumstances, lists, self-preservation, tasks, things? No more.” Lucinda Secrest McDowell in “Dwelling Places” (from “Dwell” p. 2)

“We all carry soul wounds. Scars from childhood family skirmishes. Scratches from professional rejection. Scabs from physical trauma we never saw coming. Limps from having fallen one time too many. What are your souvenirs of suffering and what will you do with them?” Lucinda Secrest McDowell in “Dwelling Places” (from “Wounds” p. 144)

 

THANK YOU CINDY! AS ALWAYS A PLEASURE TO SPEND TIME WITH YOU.

 BLESSINGS!

 ‘Til next time!

P.S.  Don’t forget about Book Club, next Monday night, September 26th, with author Kristy Cambron coming to discuss her book The Ringmaster’s Wife.  6:30-8:00 p.m., at Middletown United Methodist Church, in Louisville, KY. Bring a friend and join us!

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You’re Invited to Meet and Hear Author Kristy Cambron, Monday, September 26th, from 6:30-8:00 p.m. at Middletown United Methodist Church (PLUS FREE BOOK GIVEAWAY!!!***)

Friends! You’re invited to Branches Book Club’s first gathering of the season. Bring your friends! We’ll be extra spoiled by having the opportunity to meet and hear from author Kristy Cambron. She’s driving in from Indiana.

 

We’ll be meeting at Middletown United Methodist Church, 11902 Old Shelbyville Road, Louisville, KY 40243 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. on Monday, September 26th.

Kristy will be talking about her newest book, The Ringmaster’s Wife. You still have plenty of time to read this compelling novel and bring questions you may have for her.

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Jump onto her website and go to “books”. Click on The Ringmaster’s Wife and you’ll find a video clip of her research into the Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus. She takes you on a fabulous tour of the Ringlings’ Ca’d’Zan Mansion.

It’s just as elaborate as she describes in the book, complete with a breathtaking vista of the bay. Don’t miss the gorgeous wood in the dining room.

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Kristy’s novel is set in the 1920’s. She transports us readers right into the Roaring Twenties when the circus was gaining momentum.

An unusually talented young woman from North Yorkshire, England, Lady Rosamund Easling, is discovered by a young man named Colin Keary. He works for the Ringlings. (Colin has an interesting story revealed in the book as well.)

Colin spies Rosamund standing atop a horse while the horse gallops thru’ a field. She remains standing with an uncanny ease. Colin instantly knows he must talk her into joining the circus. You’ll be astonished at the hurdles she jumps to get to the States.

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Rosamund left a life of royalty, comfort, and a future marriage for the vagabond circus life. Her boldness will take your breath away.

I’m forever grateful for Kristy writing this novel. I confess I’ve never been much of a circus girl. Having our own three-ring circus at home (Three boys plus one wildly adventurous husband, come on!) seemed enough entertainment. Kristy and her husband are also blessed with three boys, so I’m hopeful she’ll share some of their stories on the 26th too.

When our boys were little, we took them a couple of times when the circus came to town. They preferred cotton candy to the clowns, but the elephants and tigers completely won their attention.

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We never realized the intense orchestration behind the actual production of the circus. This is one of many eye-openers Kristy includes in her novel.

Kristy also gives us a sneak peek into circus performers’ lives, the significant effort it takes to tote a circus to town, juggling the vast variety of personalities, the challenge of bookings, ticket sales, and on and on.

We readers will also witness the destructive potential of star power. Kristy weaves a little plot within the plot that’ll shock your socks off. Jealousy rares its’ ugly head and you won’t believe her who-done-it.

Happy to report there’s also a love story. Who doesn’t love a love story? You’ll be cheering the characters along.

Finally, don’t miss the unique friendship that evolves between Mrs. Ringling herself and Rosamund. It’s sweet and sincere. Can you fathom having a mentor such as Mable Ringling?

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Kristy dots her pages with God’s hand in some of her character’s faith, their prayer lives, and lessons in relying upon the Lord. Not every character has faith to cling to which is precisely what gets them into trouble. No spoiler alerts, tho’!

Read the book before September 26th and come ready to discuss it. Think of some questions you’d like to ask Kristy. If you don’t have time to read it, no worries. Please come and listen because you’ll want to read it later!

More good news: We’ll be having circus fare to eat! Caramel corn, hot dogs, corn dogs, popcorn, spun sugar (sounds fancier than cotton candy) and other nutritious treats will be on the menu. If time permits, bring something you’d like to have at a circus to add to our smorgasbord.

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Between meeting the author and the fun food, what more motivation do you need? Mark you calendar now! Please join us Monday, September 26th, from 6:30-8:00 p.m.! You won’t want to miss this!!! Don’t forget to invite your friends!

Let’s remember to ask Kristy to tell us about her next book, The Illusionist’s Apprentice coming out next year.

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Don’t forget to add to your calendar Liz Curtis Higgs and Bill Higgs are BOTH coming to our October meeting, October 24th! We’ll be discussing Mixed Signals by Liz and she’ll be interviewing Bill about his new novel, Eden Hill.

Mixed Signals

Eden Hill

31 Verses to Write on your Heart

Plus Liz’ newest book, 31 Verses to Write on Your Heart will have just released. (10/18) It will be available that night as well.

Hope to see you Monday, September 26th! Please call Nancy Tinnell at MUMC to RSVP: (502) 245-8839.

“Let us not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” Hebrews 10:25

***Please leave a comment which will enter you to win a FREE BOOK GIVEAWAY of The Ringmaster’s Wife. After five days, we’ll draw a name from the comments. I’ll mail it to you in time before the meeting.

 ‘Til next time!

 

 

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Bob Russell’s New Book, “After 50 Years of Ministry, 7 Things I’d Do Differently and 7 Things I’d Do the Same” Will Bless and Teach More Than Ministers…

God’s hand has been on Bob Russell for well over fifty years. It’s nothing short of astonishing. John and I’ve been two of thousands upon thousands of blessed recipients of his ministry.

Twenty-seven years ago, two of John’s siblings began talking non-stop about Bob and his church, Southeast Christian, where he was the Senior Pastor. We remained skeptical. The following Sunday, however, we decided to visit purely out of curiosity.

With our firstborn two-year old in tow, we were told the first floor was full. Climbing the steps, we discovered every seat was also taken in the balcony. People motioned to us to sit on the steps. Clearly this was commonplace.

The Lord was doing amazing things, drawing crowds like we’d never witnessed. Wanting to do further research, John and I stood in line one Sunday to meet Bob. Zeroing in on us, Bob asked questions, fully listening in spite of the line of people piling up behind us.

I said, “We’d love to have you and Judy over for dinner one night, if that would suit?” He quickly answered, “Sure. Give Judy a call. We’re in the phone book.” I was stunned, thinking surely they had an unlisted number. The next morning I called Judy and we set a dinner date. (Some of you are wondering, “What is a phone book?”)

Fast forward several Sunday services and a fun meal between the four of us later, John and I walked forward to join Southeast. Judy told me afterwards she about fell out of her chair when she saw us join as she’d thought we were already members. I’m beyond blessed to report we call Bob and Judy dear friends and mentors.

Last summer, I interviewed Bob about his book, The Acts of God: Why Does God Allow So Much Pain? Several of us enjoyed it as a Bible study along with the impactful teaching DVD’s. It is excellent if you’re on the hunt for a new fall study.

Acts of God Book

Now, let’s dive in to his newest book, After 50 Years of Ministry, 7 Things I’d Do Differently and 7 Things I’d Do the Same. Bob told me this book is his favorite because of the ripple effect it’s already had.

After forty years of pastoring Southeast, Bob retired.  Here’s what his retirement looks like:  For the past ten years, Bob’s been preaching all over the country and leading several mentoring retreats for pastors each year. He also writes an inspirational weekly blog plus he squeezes in a game of golf when he can (www.bobrussell.org). Sitting in a rocking chair is still not in his future!

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While ministers of all ages can greatly benefit from Bob’s book, many of my friends are reading it even though we’re not officially in the ministry. (You’ll see later where I make the case we are all in ministry of some sort.) One of our preacher friends told us he’s already watching less TV per one of Bob’s suggestions!

I started by reading all the chapter titles. When I saw Bob wrote about Judy in Chapter Four, I flipped ahead to read it first. (Kinda cheating, but not really?)

Very vulnerable, Bob confesses he wishes he’d have been “kinder, more attentive, and more animated” with Judy. He gives us readers a peek into their lives revealing valuable lessons.

Bob and Judy recently celebrated their fifty-first wedding anniversary. Their two sons and their wives and seven grandchildren are a testimony to their faithfulness not only in their marriage, but to the Lord. Their oldest grandson, Charlie, recently got married and was ordained into the ministry. He and Faith are ministering at a church just outside of Chicago.

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My favorite part of the chapter is near the end where Bob shares twelve, count-’em-twelve, reasons he loves Judy. He entitled it, “Fifty Years of Marriage—Enjoyment, Not Just Endurance.” (I told Judy that chapter alone is brownie points for life on Bob’s part. Way to go, Bob.)

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Another favorite aspect of this book is how each chapter stands on its’ own. I found myself ping-ponging between the 7 Things I’d Do Differently and 7 Things I’d Do the Same. Fascinating discoveries.

Often I’d read snippets to John. One time we’d say, “Oh wow, I had no idea.” Another time we’d howl out loud. I love how Bob stresses the importance of humor. Bob says, “I think laughing out loud is one of the healthiest things a person can do.”

Chapter Nine’s title, “I would make the necessary adjustments to cope with the taxing pressures of ministry”, has all of our names on it. After all, we’re all ministers to others, aren’t we?

Remember the saying, “You may be the only Bible someone will ever read.” True we’re not all senior pastors of a mega church, but our spheres of influence are far reaching.

Bob offers eight suggestions, many of which we can take to heart. One suggestion Bob recommends is to start each day with prayer. He prays out loud to keep himself focused.

He says, “I take time to thank God for yesterday’s experiences and answered prayers and then lay before Him the needs of that day. I pray for my family and a list of missionaries and people in need.”

Afterward I read one chapter from the Old Testament and one from the New Testament, underlining passages that are meaningful to me. Most of the time I conclude by reading a section of a Christian book.

Bob steps on all our toes, rightly so, by comparing our lives to our cell phones. We charge our phones every night, and yet we fail to recharge ourselves. Hello?

He reminds us of Jesus praying, “Give me this day my daily bread.” (Matthew 6:11) I love what The New Living Translation says, “Give us today the food we need.”

He tells of his Mother repeatedly talking about the importance of “staying prayed up.” God rest her sweet soul. I was blessed to meet Catherine Russell on occasion and can only imagine how proud of Bob she was. Bob adds, “A daily quiet time contributes to staying prayed up and lays the groundwork for ‘praying without ceasing.’”

Bob closes the book with two challenges. One is, “Be faithful.” He says, “Woody Allen was certainly no theologian, but he was right when he suggested that eighty percent of success is just showing up. ..

Sometimes the way we tell the Lord we love Him is to:

Get out of to bed,

Put our feet on the floor, and

Go about our daily assignments even though we don’t feel like it.

That’s called faithfulness.”

Two examples of this popped in my head from a couple of books I’ve been reading. One comes from Lysa TerKeurst. She talks about her daughter’s struggle with a certain sport. She said she finally had to keep telling her, “Just show up for practice. Just show up for practice.” (www.lysaterkeurst.com )

Another one comes from Ken Davis. He said while he was attempting to morph into a cyclist in Fully Alive, he’d try to make himself go one more telephone pole further on each ride. (www.kendavis.com )

May we press on for God’s glory and “May all who come behind us find us faithful.”

Now, please go grab Bob’s book and start reading! You’ll be blessed beyond measure, a beautiful picture of Bob’s favorite verse:

“Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.” (Ephesians 3:20-21 NIV)

 ‘Til next time!

 

 

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